September 2014

Santiago v. Dept. of Education illustrates that in an employment discrimination case, the plaintiff must plausibly allege an “adverse employment action.” The quintessential “adverse employment action” is, of course, termination. However, other actions short of termination may qualify. Plaintiff – an itinerant attendance teacher – alleged disparate treatment and a hostile work environment under the…

Read More Employment Discrimination Lawsuit Dismissed; No “Adverse Action”

Here is the recently-filed federal court complaint (captioned Jermaine Gilyard v. Nine West Group et al., 1:14-cv-07096) in which plaintiff alleges, among other things, that he “was subjected to a hostile work environment on the basis of race, racial discrimination, was disciplined several times on spurious charges, and was finally fired … in retaliation for his attempts…

Read More Race Discrimination and Hostile Work Environment Lawsuit Against Nine West Group

Cafe Lalo, the Upper West Side cafe featured in the Tom Hanks/Meg Ryan romantic comedy “You’ve Got Mail” has been sued for wage violations and sexual harassment. Here’s the complaint. The plaintiffs, several women, allege (among other things) that defendant Daniel Reyes, a “barista and defacto manager … treated the restaurant as his own personal dating…

Read More “You’ve Got Mail” Cafe Sued for Sexual Harassment and Wage Violations

In Samarskaya v. MVAIC, Judge Bluth of the New York Supreme Court, New York County denied defendant Motor Vehicle Accident Indemnification Corporation’s (MVAIC) motion for summary judgment. Plaintiff alleged that while riding her bicycle, she was struck by an opened rear passenger-side door of a taxi, which then drove off. Under Article 52 of the…

Read More MVAIC Denied Dismissal in Case of Cyclist “Doored” by Taxi Passenger

In Davis v. Duane Reade, Inc. (2d Dept. Sept. 24, 2014), the court explained the narrow scope of the waiver provision of New York’s Whistleblower Law: Labor Law § 740(7) provides that “the institution of an action in accordance with this section shall be deemed a waiver of the rights and remedies available under any…

Read More Court Clarifies Limited Scope of Whistleblower Law’s Waiver Provision

In Pal v. New York University (Summary Order dated 9/22/14), the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit clarified that New York’s “Whistleblower” law – New York Labor Law § 740 – only provides for “equitable” relief (such as back pay), does not allow recovery for “future or anticipated lost wages or benefits,” and does not provide…

Read More Second Circuit Clarifies Remedies Available Under New York’s “Whistleblower Law”, New York Labor Law 740/741

Here is the complaint, recently filed by model Carolina Rommel, against the owner of NoHo restaurant Public. Plaintiff alleges that, while dining at defendant’s restaurant in October 2011, she “bit into a rock contained in a warm lentil salad that had been served to her by defendant. It further alleges: Plaintiff’s injuries have been exacerbated…

Read More This Restaurant’s Salad Rocks (Not in the Good Way)

In D’Agostino v. YRC, Inc., the Appellate Division, Second Department affirmed the denial of summary judgment on liability in favor of the plaintiff, who was struck in the rear. Here are the facts: During the late night hours of October 22, 2010, the plaintiff was driving in the northbound right lane of Interstate 87, near…

Read More Possible Explanation for Rear-End Collision Precludes Summary Judgment in Favor of Rear-Ended Plaintiff

Here and below is the complaint filed in Brooklyn federal court on September 15, 2014 against a Queens and Long Island medical practice known as DocCare and its CEO Alan Bigman. Here’s the New York Post article on the lawsuit. Plaintiff, who worked for defendants as a medical assistant, alleges that defendant failed to pay plaintiff for…

Read More Plaintiff Sues for Wage/Overtime Violations After Being Fired, Ostensibly Because of Instagram Smoking Photo