Articles

The Americans with Disabilities Act, New York State Human Rights Law, and New York City Human Rights Law all prohibit discrimination on the basis of a “disability”. The term “disability” is defined by the statutes in a specific way; thus a medical condition must come under the statutory definition of “disability” in order for a disability discrimination…

Read More What is a “Disability” Within the Meaning of the Anti-Discrimination Laws?

Employment discrimination law is (for the most part) statutory, and is distributed among a variety of federal, state, and local laws and regulations. Although these statutes’ protections may overlap, they differ in terms of (e.g.) which employers are covered, administrative filing prerequisites, and damages/remedies. Below is a summary (not a complete listing or explanation) of…

Read More Which Employment Discrimination Laws Protect New York City Workers?

One type of disability discrimination claim recognized by the anti-discrimination laws is a so-called “failure to accommodate” claim. This article is meant to give an overview of general principles applicable; it is not intended to cover all aspects of the law on this topic. In order to establish a failure to accommodate claim under the…

Read More The “Failure to Accommodate Disability” Cause of Action

In employment discrimination law, the so-called “same actor inference” holds that “[w]hen the person who made the decision to fire was the same person who made the decision to hire, it is difficult to impute to [him] an invidious motivation that would be inconsistent with the decision to hire.” Orellana v. Reiss Wholesale Hardware Co., No.…

Read More The “Same Actor Inference” in Employment Discrimination Law

Not every action taken by an employer against an employee is actionable under the anti-discrimination laws, even if the action is tied to a so-called protected characteristic. The dividing line between actionable and non-actionable conduct – for claims of retaliation or status-based discrimination – is the presence, or absence, of an “adverse employment action.” As…

Read More What is an “Adverse Employment Action”?

By now you’ve probably heard/read about Dr. Anjali Ramkissoon, who was caught on a now-viral YouTube video attacking an Uber driver. Reports indicate that her employer, Jackson Health System, has placed her on administrative leave. The video suggests that Dr. Ramkissoon was not working or “on the clock” during the incident. This raises the question of whether, and to what…

Read More Off-Duty Conduct and Termination